Posts Tagged ‘Vermont’

Creative Ways To Use Vermont-Made Kimchi

Written by Sky Barsch on . Posted in Taste of the Landscape

Head shot of Elena Gustavson

Elena Gustavson

In our Autumn 2015 issue, we looked at the growing number of specialty food producers making fermented foods like kimchi, a spicy Korean side dish often made with cabbage. Our mouths watered when we read about Wild Rhythms Farms Sobremesa kimchi with habanero and Chrysalis Cultures‘ Hoagie Helper — seasoned with horseradish, leeks and oregano. Sure, these treats are good and strong straight out of the jar, but there are many creative ways to incorporate kimchi into daily use.

To learn more, we checked in with Elena Gustavson, a multi-ethnic Vermonter (her mother is Korean) who is passionate about food and works with Rutland Area Farm and Food Link. Of course, kimchi is an obvious choice as a side dish for Korean food, but there are other ways (like adding kimchi to a Bloody Mary) that are equally delicious.

The Sobremesa line of kimchi. Photo by Daria Bishop.

The Sobremesa line of kimchi. Photo by Daria Bishop.

Gustavson recommends …

Kimchi and cheese: Grilled sandwiches, crepes and omelets

  • Kimchi, cream cheese and cheddar melts on rye or sourdough bread “Absolutely heavenly,” Gustavson says. “The heat of the kimchi elevates the tang of a sharp cheddar, the way a pinch of cayenne elevates a cheese sauce. Throw in an egg, ham and/or turkey, and you have an amazing breakfast sandwich.”
  • “Hapa” version of pajeon (Korean scallion pancakes) Make a more crepe-like batter

    Continue Reading

Q&A: Charlie Hunter

Written by Sky Barsch on . Posted in Q&A, The Arts

Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 11.29.52 AMIn the Autumn 2015 issue of Vermont Life, we featured the work of Bellows Falls–based painter Charlie Hunter in a piece called “Rail Town Noir.” Hunter’s work is monochromatic interpretations of rail yards, bridges and other industrial scenes. He also leads plein-air workshops here in Vermont and around the country. 

VL: What have you been creating this summer?
CH: The major thing has been the Eyes on the Land triptych, which is now done and — slowly — drying. I deliver it to the Shelburne Museum in mid-September
, and it goes up at the end of the month.

VL: What’s the most difficult thing you’ve ever tried to paint? 
CH: The ineffable loneliness of existence. That, and boats.

VL: Is asking you to talk about your favorite pieces like asking you to choose a favorite child?
CH: No, one vomits these forth (laughs). One of the musicians we managed, Chris Smither, he wrote a song Bonnie Raitt does called “Love Me Like a Man,” that’s done really well for him. He says, “People say, do you have a favorite song? And you answer them, they’re like your children. You love them. However, some of the children grow up and get a job at Circle K. This one went to Harvard and became a doctor.”

VL: How is your Bellows Falls Workshop (Sept. 23–27) taking shape?
CH: Right now, we have one room at the inn left. So it’s like nine folks for the full whack, and a few day students. My friend and fellow Putney painter John Smith — I tell him he needs to get more creative in his aliases — will be serving as water boy. He knows all about the technical aspects of art supplies, so he’s really useful to have around.

VL: What will you be painting?
CH: We’re going to paint at the railroad yards for sure, and then also down by the abandoned paper mills. It’s like a Piranesian cathedral of decrepitude down there. It’s wonderful.

Growing Need

Written by Susan Reid on . Posted in Q&A, Way of (Vermont) Life

The center employs a hands-on approach in teaching life skills, and found success building a garden shared by mothers and their children.

The center employs a hands-on approach in teaching life skills, and found success building a garden shared by mothers and their children. Photo by Daria Bishop.

The high quality of life apparent in Vermont’s thriving ski towns and college hubs can sometimes mask problems that exist in other parts of the state. Springfield, a community of 9,000, is currently coping with the decline of manufacturing jobs. The Springfield Area Parent Child Center provides local residents with everything from child care and playgroups to free evening parenting classes and professional help with learning delays and behavior problems. Administrative manager Jan Zona talks about the center’s efforts to provide real-world solutions for struggling Vermonters.

VL: What first brought you to Vermont?
JZ: I moved to Springfield from Fairfield County, Connecticut, 13 years ago with my husband, Gary. We were looking to live and work in a less congested area and enjoy life in a more rural setting. When I was a child, my dad helped build a camp for a friend in East Wallingford, and we spent many weekends there. The first time I ever skied was at Okemo Mountain. Little did I know that years later I would work there!

VL: You were guest services manager there for 10 years before joining the Parent Child Center. That’s an unusual transition.
JZ: It might seem like a leap to go from a resort to a nonprofit, but in reality, I have just moved from one service industry to another. Now, rather than help visitors enjoy their time here, I can help the youngest citizens in our community and 
their families.

VL: What has been the biggest change at the center since it began?
JZ: Our growth. We started in a small house on Myrtle Street in 1992 with a core group of six to eight employees. Now we have a staff of

Continue Reading

Contact Us

Vermont Life Editorial and Business Offices: (802) 828-3241
(8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., EST, weekdays)

Subscriptions: Please note, the subscription offices are closed New Year's Day, Easter, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Offices close at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Address: One National Life Drive, 6th Floor, Montpelier, VT 05620

Letters to the Editor

Subscriptions

Advertising

Customer Service

Suggest a Product