Give a Subscription, Get One Free!

Receive a FREE subscription to Vermont Life when you give a subscription to a friend.

The Arts | Winter 2015-16

Written by Bill Anderson on . Posted in The Arts

TAO
“Seventeen Samurai”
Paramount Theatre
Rutland | Jan. 26

Formed in 1993, this Japanese drum-and-dance troupe crisscrossed its native country for about a decade before breaking out at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Since then, they have toured the globe, offering a kinetic blitz of percussion, choreography and costumes. 
The Arizona Republic said: “The explosive sounds and insistent rhythms create a 
sort of epic visceral thrill.”
7 p.m., $45.50, 
paramountvt.org

“DECO JAPAN: 
SHAPING ART AND CULTURE, 1920–1945”
Middlebury College Museum of Art
Jan. 29–April 24

Some 200 works are on exhibit, curated to showcase “the spectacular craftsmanship and sophisticated design long associated with Japan, and convey the complex social and cultural tensions in Japan leading up to World War II.” The college says the works — including paintings, ceramics, sculpture, fashion and other art forms — are drawn from the Levenson Collection, described as the world’s premier private collection of Japanese art in the deco and modern style.
Free, middlebury.edu

“BLACK ANGELS OVER TUSKEGEE”
Flynn MainStage
Burlington | Jan. 29

The courage of the Tuskegee airmen, trailblazers in the fight to fully integrate the U.S. military, has been celebrated in many ways through films, documentaries, TV episodes and more. This stage dramatization, written and directed by Layon Gray, opened in Los Angeles in 2009 and moved shortly after to New York, where it continues as one of the longest-running plays in off-Broadway history. Such success speaks for itself, and the drama can melt the heart of even the

Continue Reading

Q&A: Charlie Hunter

Written by Sky Barsch on . Posted in Q&A, The Arts

Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 11.29.52 AMIn the Autumn 2015 issue of Vermont Life, we featured the work of Bellows Falls–based painter Charlie Hunter in a piece called “Rail Town Noir.” Hunter’s work is monochromatic interpretations of rail yards, bridges and other industrial scenes. He also leads plein-air workshops here in Vermont and around the country. 

VL: What have you been creating this summer?
CH: The major thing has been the Eyes on the Land triptych, which is now done and — slowly — drying. I deliver it to the Shelburne Museum in mid-September
, and it goes up at the end of the month.

VL: What’s the most difficult thing you’ve ever tried to paint? 
CH: The ineffable loneliness of existence. That, and boats.

VL: Is asking you to talk about your favorite pieces like asking you to choose a favorite child?
CH: No, one vomits these forth (laughs). One of the musicians we managed, Chris Smither, he wrote a song Bonnie Raitt does called “Love Me Like a Man,” that’s done really well for him. He says, “People say, do you have a favorite song? And you answer them, they’re like your children. You love them. However, some of the children grow up and get a job at Circle K. This one went to Harvard and became a doctor.”

VL: How is your Bellows Falls Workshop (Sept. 23–27) taking shape?
CH: Right now, we have one room at the inn left. So it’s like nine folks for the full whack, and a few day students. My friend and fellow Putney painter John Smith — I tell him he needs to get more creative in his aliases — will be serving as water boy. He knows all about the technical aspects of art supplies, so he’s really useful to have around.

VL: What will you be painting?
CH: We’re going to paint at the railroad yards for sure, and then also down by the abandoned paper mills. It’s like a Piranesian cathedral of decrepitude down there. It’s wonderful.

Arts Spotlight: Jazz Ambassador Reuben Jackson

Written by Bill Anderson on . Posted in The Arts

ReubenJackson_credit Stephanie Seguino

Reuben Jackson. Courtesy photo by Stephanie Seguino.

A treasure in our midst, Reuben Jackson, host of VPR’s “Friday Night Jazz,” moved to Vermont in 2011 after 20 years as the curator of the Duke Ellington Collection at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a teenager, he first encountered Vermont in 1974 en route home from a vacation in Montreal, and while, at first, he says he was panic-stricken — “I’d never been stared at before,” — by the time he left, “I was smitten by the state’s beauty.”

He returned to attend Goddard College, and after working in D.C., he came back to Vermont; then in 2012 he took over as host of “Friday Night Jazz.” Calm and equipoised, Jackson’s show reliably presents, as one listener commented online, “an elegantly eclectic mix of textures, tempos and eras.” Each program displays a formidable range, yet never feels forced.

“I try to balance old and new,” Jackson says, “and I love cross-pollinations. I enjoy looking at the relationships between the music, and the evolution of that which continues to influence jazz.”

To read the extended version of this spotlight, see page 16 in the Summer 2015 issue.

Contact Us

Vermont Life Editorial and Business Offices: (802) 828-3241
(8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., EST, weekdays)

Subscriptions: Please note, the subscription offices are closed New Year's Day, Easter, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Offices close at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Address: One National Life Drive, 6th Floor, Montpelier, VT 05620

Letters to the Editor

Subscriptions

Advertising

Customer Service

Suggest a Product